Tuesday, November 21, 2006

Courage

YOUR REAL COURAGE SHOWS BEST IN THE HOUR OF ADVERSITY

Some setbacks are so severe that to give in to them means losing the whole ball game. When he assumed command of the Korean War, Gen. Matthew Ridgeway found his forces pushed far to the south, hard pressed by the invaders. Only a determined decision to hold the lines allowed the American forces to keep from being swept into the sea and to eventually regain all the territory they had lost. When a defeat strikes, you may not have the time to withdraw and contemplate your mistakes without risking further setbacks. Don’t succumb to paralysis. It is important to know at that moment what it is you truly desire and to act to preserve your resources and your hope. If you crumble utterly, you will take a blow to your self-esteem that will be hard to repair. Instead, stick to your principles, and you will know, at the very least, that you have protected the most important thing you have.

1 comment:

  1. This is another Thought for the Day from the Napoleon Hill Foundation:

    "MOST FAILURES COULD HAVE BEEN CONVERTED INTO SUCCESSES IF SOMEONE HAD HELD ON ANOTHER MINUTE OR MADE MORE EFFORT.

    When you have the potential for success within you, adversity and temporary defeat only help you prepare to reach great heights of success. Without adversity, you would never develop the qualities of reliability, loyalty, humility, and perseverance that are so essential to enduring success. Many people have escaped the jaws of defeat and achieved great victories because they would not allow themselves to fail. When your escape routes are all closed, you will be surprised how quickly you will find the path to success."
    -----------------------------------

    This stuff really resonates with me. Don't give up, don't give in, etc., etc. It's more easily accomplished (or less difficult) when you have a strong support network to cope with the difficulties and reinforce your positive energy. This I've learned over the past four months...

    ReplyDelete

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